Dogs :: Mastering Puppy Leash Training

Does your puppy refuse to keep pace with you while walking in the public? It is a very awkward and frustrating situation when your puppy sits down or stops when you are trying to take him for a walk. This is a great example of why puppy leash training is necessary and how it can help get rid of some of these frustrating situations. Your puppy should be trained to walk with you without being stubborn — and there is likely a reason they are being difficult. Leash training will teach your puppy to walk on a leash without causing you stress every time you go for a walk. This is an important thing to train your puppy since leash training is a very basic lesson they will need to learn before going onto more advanced lessons such as housebreaking.

Puppy leash training requires certain basic steps which you should follow. If you do not follow a steady, consistent training plan you will not reduce their tugging and pulling. When going on walks use a soft and comfortable collar for your puppy that will not harm them in any way. From the beginning make it a habit for your puppy to be attached by the collar every time you go for a walk. You have to use a collar that goes around your puppy’s neck even if they are stubborn about wearing it at first. If you feel dog walker atlanta it may help, use a harness style restraint that goes under the dog’s belly. For a few days your puppy may not like the collar but they will adjust over the course of their training — just be persistent.

Once you find your puppy totally comfortable with the leash you may take him out for a walk. If your puppy is uncomfortable give them some more time to get used to it. Puppy leash training requires you to keep slack in the leash and make sure the puppy is comfortable. If your puppy is still being stubborn then he is not yet ready to go for a walk. Try tying the collar around your puppy and walking with him inside your room and in between praise him for keeping pace with you. The moment your puppy starts to pull give a quick little tug and start walking in another direction. This will eventually lead them to follow the same way you are walking.

http://www.articlebiz.com/article/252109-1-mastering-puppy-leash-training/

10 Surprising Cat-Care Tips – ABC News

In his latest book, ” Your Cat: The Owner’s Manual,” Dr. Marty Becker offers his expert advice for new cat owners.  From his tips on how to prevent health problems to how to stop cats from scratching the furniture, this book covers any cat-related question you might have.  Check out Dr. Becker’s top ten surprising cat-care tips from his book below.

Cats Dig Running Water

A pet drinking fountain is one of the best investments you can make in your cat’s health.  Cats find cool, running water to be appealing – it’s a natural behavior, because stream water is less likely to be contaminated than a stagnant pool.  Cats tend to be chronically dehydrated, and feline fountains are proven to get cats to drink more water. Many feline health problems can be aided with proper hydration, and it’s more efficient than leaving a faucet dripping to entice your cat to drink.

Pick a Pretty, Allergy-Easy Kitty

While no cat is guaranteed to not be an allergy trigger – and people with life-threatening reactions are better off without a cat – it’s possible to pick a pet who might be less of a problem.  Black, unneutered males are purported the worst choice for people with allergies, since they typically have higher levels in their saliva of FelD1, the protein that triggers sneezing and wheezing. Some breeds of cat, most notably the Siberian, have a high number of individual animals with low levels of FelD1. If you’re paying for a  “hypo-allergenic” cat, insist on saliva testing. If you’re choosing a kitten, choose a light-colored female, and get her spayed.

Panting Is a Problem

Dogs pant up to 300 times a minute to cool themselves, but if you see your cat panting it may be a medical emergency. While sometimes it can just be from extreme anxiety, it can also be a sign of respiratory or cardiovascular problems, warranting an immediate call to the veterinarian.

Canned Cat Food Is Preferred

Veterinarians recommend feeding canned cat food over kibble. Canned foods have a higher percentage of protein and fat than dry foods and are significantly higher in water content than kibble (70 percent vs 10 percent). Also, canned foods tend to be more palatable to cats that are finicky, elderly or have dental problems.  Better health for your cat can start by closing the all-day kitty kibble buffet and feeding measured amounts of a good canned food. Talk to your veterinarian.

Want a Cat to Love You? Look Away!

What can you do to get a cat to come to you? Avoid eye contact. Cats don’t like eye contact with strangers, so will almost always go to the person who’s not looking at them. This also is the answer to the age-old mystery of why cats always seem to go to the one person in the room who doesn’t like cats. It’s because she may be the only one not “rudely” – in the cat’s view – staring.

Tale of the Tail

You can tell a cat’s mood by watching his tail. Tail upright, happy; tail moving languidly, keep petting me; tail low, twitching erratically, I’m on the prowl; tail swishing rapidly, beware and leave me alone. If you’ve ever been surprised when a cat you’re petting suddenly grabs you angrily, you missed a tail tale: The unhappy twitch of the tail tip would have told you to stop petting, now.

Surprising Signs of a Cat in Pain

Chronic pain is not uncommon in cats, especially as they age. Cat-lovers miss the signs of a pet in pain because cats are good at hiding it. Any cat observed as being hesitant to jump up or climb, not using the litter box, not able to groom themselves as well, more aggressive or more withdrawn need to see the veterinarian. These are classic signs of discomfort, and need to be addressed.

What Litter Do Cats Really Prefer?

Forget the people-pleasing scents. Forget special formulas or alternative ingredients. Your cat is more likely to prefer unscented clumping litter, according to preference tests. And if you want to keep your cat using “the bathroom,” be sure to keep it clean, place it in a quiet, cat-friendly place and don’t use any liners in the box – cats don’t like them. None of these changes will address a cat who has stopped using the box because of illness. Urinary tract infections and other health issues need to be addressed by your veterinarian before box re-training can commence.

How to Prevent a Finicky Cat

Feed your kitten a few different foods so he or she will experience different textures and flavors of food. Just as people typically stick with the toothpaste they start with as youngsters, cats who are only exposed to one type of food will be less likely try other brands and kinds. That can be a real problem if the favored food goes off the market, or your cat needs to eat a special food for health reasons. So mix it up on your kitten.

Don’t Toss That Ratty Scratching Post

When a post starts looking worn is when a cat starts liking it best. Get a new one and your cat may switch to the arm of the couch. Instead, refresh your cat’s post by adding some coils of fresh sisal rope – it’s cheap, easy to add and cats love to dig their claws into it.

http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/lifestyle/2012/05/10-surprising-cat-care-tips/

A Beginners Guide To Betting On Greyhound Racing

As one of the most popular types of animal racing in the world, greyhound racing betting has many different types of bets that can be made with many different types of outcomes. There are often multiple dogs that are involved in the race and the bets are made on the position that the dogs are going to arrive over the finish line. Online betting sites with “racebooks” set the greyhound racing betting odds.

The odds are available through the race and are created by the sports books. These odds are going to determine the likelihood of a certain dog coming in a certain place through the race.

The important odds to consider are the first, second and third for most bets that are being made. It is important to realize that the odds given for the race are accurate and the odds makers have years of experience in determining the results of the race and therefore the odds should be considered accordingly.

How can you determine what the prize will be once the bet has been made? The prize that will be given to the successful bettor depends on two factors; the amount that has been bet and the odds that are placed on the bet that has been made.

Using these two factors, greyhound racing betting sites will determine the prize that is going to be awarded. Many times, these prizes are outlined with the bet that is being made, allowing even beginners to determine the potential prize that is available with the bet that has been made.

Using the odds and learning about the dogs and the specifics of the sport can be a great way to get into greyhound racing betting online.

Many online racebooks allow the bettor to take part in betting practices without actually being in the local area, as they can showcase the matches online with the use of the streaming video that can be presented to clients, allowing the clients to watch the races that are being bet on, with ease.

Choosing between the many greyhound racing websites that are available is simple, when the reputation of the website is compared with the races and the bets that can be made.

http://racing.ezinemark.com/a-beginners-guide-to-betting-on-greyhound-racing-31a3e5c2ab9.html

48 Hours Mystery: The dog trainer of Anacortes

Produced by Liza Finley with Marcelena Spencer and Sara Rodriguez

(This story originally aired on Feb. 5.)

Mark Stover was known as the dog whisperer of the Pacific Northwest – a man who could tangle with the most ferocious canine and bring it to its knees.

“He was almost more dog than he was human. I would see him get down on all fours and look at the dogs right in their eyes and he just had this amazing connection,” says friend and client Andrea Franulovich.

“I think every once in a while you run across these people that are extraordinary. And Mark definitely was … extraordinary,” she continues. “He just had this way to be able to walk in the room and just grab the attention from everybody.”

An outdoorsman and avid hunter, Stover was also a history buff and gun collector with over 30 firearms, says his sister Vicky Simmons.

“Highly intelligent, well-read, excellent cook,” Simmons describes her brother. “He could be difficult. He could be pointed in his comments.”

A hard edge, she says, that came from a tough upbringing. Their father died when Mark was just 18 months old; then, a sister died.

“It wasn’t a normal childhood. Survival was a pretty big item on our list,” Simmons says. “And my mother just had a very hard time.”

And she had an even harder time reining in her rebellious son. “He was on bad path,” Simmons says. “He got kicked out of high school for smoking dope… I think he was stumbling in the dark for a number of those years.”

And then, a German Shepherd named Gunther came into his life.

“Mark and that dog bonded that very day … it gave meaning to his life. Gave purpose to his life,” Simmons says. “That dog saved him.”

Mark trained that puppy to become a search and rescue dog. He had found his calling – a calling that eventually led him to the woman of his dreams, Linda Opdycke.

“I was looking to do some training with my dog and went through the phone book and found him in the phone book,” she tells “48 Hours Mystery” correspondent Peter Van Sant in an exclusive interview.

The daughter of multimillionaire Wally Opdycke – once co-owner of Chateau Ste. Michelle Winery and K2 Ski Corporation – Linda was Mark Stover’s type: tall, beautiful and rich. At first, she says, the feeling was not mutual.

“I felt he was very arrogant, actually rubbed me the wrong way initially,” she tells Van Sant. “But yet he seemed also to know a fair amount about dogs, so I thought, ‘Let’s try this out.'”

In Linda Opdycke, Mark Stover had met his match. This one time junior Olympic equestrienne could shoot and fly cast as well he. The high school dropout who came from nothing and the elegant beauty born of privilege fell in love.

“He was incredibly bright, eccentric – um, charismatic in many ways – very witty,” she says.

Three months into their relationship, the couple opened a dog training business on Kiket Island, a private island owned by Linda’s parents.

“I really had a vision for this business,” she says. “I’d swim the dogs, we’d do massage therapy for them. Really a lot of custom care for the animals.”

By 2002, Stover & Opdycke had grown into a million dollar-a-year enterprise. After 11 years together, Linda and Mark finally decided to get married.

Father Wally toasted his new son-in-law, but Linda’s mother, Nancy Corbin, wasn’t celebrating the moment.

“Mark is not a choice I would have made for Linda,” Corbin says. “From the beginning, Mark showed an arrogance … where he wanted to isolate Linda, all bad signs.”

“I didn’t listen and I should have,” Linda says of her mother’s concern.

Linda says the dark corners of Mark Stover’s personality began to emerge more frequently.

“The last few years of being in a relationship with him was incredibly difficult,” she explains. “The more the business began making money, the more obsessed he became with money… I would buy maybe a $5 item at the grocery store and he would be in a rage about it… For example, an avocado. That was too much money, really upset him.”

“You guys had a million dollar business, he’s upset that you bought an avocado?” remarks Van Sant.

“I recognized Mark was really somebody different than I had thought he was,” Linda replies. “He was in rages and atlanta dog walking service he had tantrums all the time, everyday and it was very, very difficult to live with. I saw him becoming more aggressive with people, for example, on the property.”

Danny Jensen was clamming on Kikit Island when he came face to face with an angry Stover brandishing a gun.

“He threatened us with a handgun,” Jensen recalls. “He told us that this was his land, we were not allowed to dig clams there, and that he would hurt us.”

Asked if Mark Stover would have been capable of using that gun, Jensen replies, “Oh, definitely.”

Similar incidents followed and it was taking a toll on their marriage.

“I told him I was ashamed by the behavior. This is not how my family does things and this is my family’s property and I would like him to approach people with respect,” says Linda.

In 2005, after 14 years together – three years of marriage – Linda Opdycke had had enough. “I decided I could not be in the marriage with Mark anymore because it just continued – the abuse, escalated and I really, literally, felt like I was dying.”

She told Mark she was leaving him.

“He went just sheer white. His eyes went just crazy. He clenched his hands and fists and he was just in a shaking rage,” she recalls. “He says, ‘You’ve got war! I’m not going to grant this to you. You’ve got a big fight on your hands.'”

Neither one of them had any idea just how big a fight it would be.

http://www.cbsnews.com/news/48-hours-mystery-the-dog-trainer-of-anacortes/

British dogs trained to sniff out diabetes | Reuters

By Georgina Cooper

| AYLESBURY, England

AYLESBURY, England Dogs are being trained in Britain as potential life-savers to warn diabetic owners when their blood sugar levels fall to dangerously low levels.

Man’s best friend already has been shown capable of sniffing out certain cancer cells, and dogs have long been put to work in the hunt for illegal drugs and explosives.

Their new front-line role in diabetes care follows recent evidence suggesting a dog’s hyper-sensitive nose can detect tiny changes that occur when a person is about to have a hypoglycemic attack.

A survey last December by researchers at Queen’s University Belfast found 65 percent of 212 people with insulin-dependent diabetes reported that when they had a hypoglycemic episode their pets had reacted by whining, barking, licking or some other display.

At the Cancer and Bio-Detection Dogs research center in Aylesbury, southern England, animal trainers are putting that finding into practice and honing dogs’ innate skills.

The charity has 17 rescue dogs at various stages of training that will be paired up with diabetic owners, many of them children.

“Dogs have been trained to detect certain odors down to parts per trillion, so we are talking tiny, tiny amounts. Their world is really very different to ours,” Chief Executive Claire Guest told Reuters TV.

The center was started five years ago by orthopedic surgeon Dr John Hunt, who wanted to investigate curious anecdotes about dogs pestering their owners repeatedly on parts of their body that were later found to be cancerous.

At around the same time, the first hard evidence was being gathered by researchers down the road at Amersham Hospital that dogs could identify bladder cancer from chemicals in urine.

The move into diabetes followed the case of Paul Jackson, who told Guest and her team about his dog Tinker who warns him when his sugar levels get too low and he is in danger of collapsing.

“It’s generally licking my face, panting beside me. It depends how far I have gone before he realizes,” Jackson said.

Tinker has now been trained by the Aylesbury center and is a fully qualified Diabetic Hypo-Alert dog, complete with red jacket to announce himself as a working assistance animal.

The center is continuing work to perfect dogs’ ability in spotting signs of cancer. But while dog-lover Guest says it would be nice to have a dog in every doctor’s office to screen for disease, ultimately that is not practical.

Instead, she hopes the research will lead to the invention of an electronic nose that will mimic a dog’s.

“At the moment electronic noses are not as advanced as the dogs’, they are about 15 years behind. But the work that we are doing and what we are finding out will help scientists advance quickly so that they can use electronic noses to do the same thing,” she said.

(Additional reporting and writing by Ben Hirschler; editing by Michael Roddy)

http://www.reuters.com/article/us-diabetes-dogs-idUSTRE55L2B020090622

Top Tips for Adopting a Shelter Dog

October is national Adopt a Shelter Dog month. So if you are looking for a great four-legged addition to your family, now is the perfect time to get a pet that desperately needs a home. On “The Early Show,” Resident Veterinarian and CBS News correspondent Dr. Debbye Turner Bell shared some tips on how to find a good pet at a shelter for you and your family:

There are eight to 10 million homeless animals in shelters across the country and the cold, hard reality is that approximately half of them — four million — will not find homes and have to be euthanized. Shelters are a great place to find a great pet. You just need to do your homework, know what you’re looking for, and ask the right questions.

The good shelters out there will have already done a lot of the legwork for you. You can expect them to have already spayed or neutered the pet. They should have already vaccinated and de-wormed the animal. And if there were any underlying health issues when the pet arrived at the shelter, the staff veterinarian should have already completed, or at least started, the treatment. When shelters adopt out an animal, they don’t ever want to see that animal back in a shelter. So, most will do all they can to make sure the pet you take home is healthy, happy, and whole, so that the pet is with you for the rest of his life. But let’s face it, there is a reason that the animal ended up in the shelter in the first place. While some shelter animals were perfect pets and the owners relinquished or abandoned it through no fault of the pet, a large majority (some report 60 percent or more) end up at the shelter because of behavior issues, like barking, aggression, chewing, or general unsocialized behavior. That is why it is essential to ask the right questions and know exactly what you’re getting into.

When you visit the shelter, keep your eyes open. Be observant! Avoid animals that look sick; that have runny eyes or noses, dull eyes, persistent cough, sneezes, are lethargic, or seem fearful. Many of us are drawn to the “underdog” but the dog that is cowering in the back of the cage with his/her ears back, head down, and tail tucked between the legs may be extremely fearful. Sometimes a fearful dog can be an aggressive dog. A significant portion of dogs that bite, bite out of fear. This dog may need special attention, socialization, and training.

Ask the shelter about the dog’s history. Unfortunately, sometimes the shelter just doesn’t know the animal’s history if he is a stray or abandoned pet. But many times they do know. Find out if the pet has any health concerns, chronic diseases, or history of behavior problems (like biting or nipping, digging, chewing or barking). Often if the animal does have a behavior issue, that is exactly why they ended up in the shelter in the first place! Confirm that the pet has been spayed or neutered, de-wormed, checked for heartworms, and vaccinated. If these things have not been done, ask the shelter if they will perform these tasks before you take the pet home.

WHAT TO ASK:

o Get a complete history of the animal that you are considering.

o Age (Although sometimes there is no way for the shelter to know for sure), breed, gender

o Where the dog came from

o What was his previous living situation

o What is his medical history

o How has he behaved since being at the shelter

o Ask if the dog has any ongoing medical issues (cancer, diabetes, intestinal parasites, heartworms, etc.) and if the dog is on any medication.

o Ask what follow-up services that shelter provides, such as obedience training, consultation for behavioral problems, medical services.

o Ask about their return policy. It’s important to know if you can return the dog if the adoption does not work out.

While all animals in a shelter should have a chance at a good life in a great home, you might want to take a closer look at the shelter itself. A good shelter is clean, smells good, friendly, and very knowledgeable. Often shelters will have a veterinarian on staff, as well as a staff behaviorist. In these cases, you can expect all the animals ready for adoption have received the proper medical care that they need and the behaviorist has evaluated his/her temperament and worked out any behavior issues.

WHAT TO EXPECT:

o Most shelters will conduct an interview with you to determine your lifestyle, resources, and dedication to providing a “forever home” for the animal. You usually will have to fill out a fairly exhaustive application that will ask questions about your employment, living situation, family members, income, other pets in the home, etc. Expect a good shelter to ask YOU as many (if not more) questions than you ask them.

o Many shelters ask for references and check them!

o Some shelters will even conduct a home evaluation to make sure your living environment is suitable for a pet.

o Animals will already have been spayed or neutered. Or you will have to provide assurance that you will spay or neuter your new pet as soon as they reach the appropriate age.

o The animal will also already be vaccinated and de-wormed.

o There is usually an adoption fee, but it is much less than the cost or purchasing an animal at a pet shop or breeder. Expect to pay anywhere from $50-150 or more.

o Shelters have visiting hours, so call ahead to know when is the right time to show up.

o After you’ve taken your newest, furriest family member home, often the shelter will call you to see how you and the new pet are doing.

HOW TO CHOOSE:

o First understand your lifestyle and expectations. You should choose a dog whose own natural traits best fits your lifestyle. If you lead a busy, active lifestyle, then you want a dog that fits your household. If you want a lap dog, then don’t choose a Border Collie!

o Carefully look at the breeds or dogs that match your lifestyle. Spend time with each animal. Observe how the dog relates to you. Look for a “connection” with that dog. Often the dog with “pick you” if you take the time to notice.

o Avoid animals that look sick (i.e. Runny nose or eyes, scaly skin, dull coat, open sores, lethargic, coughing or sneezing, etc.)

o Pick a dog that is curious and alert but not fearful or jumpy. When approached, the dog should accept your advances, sniff you, or even present her belly or rump to be scratched.

o If you have other pets at home, observe how the shelter candidate interacts with other animals. Avoid those that display aggression toward or extreme fear of other animals. A very general rule of thumb when bringing home a dog with existing dogs in the home, is to choose a dog that is younger and opposite sex of the dog you already have at home.

o Before you make your final choice, take the ENTIRE family to the shelter to meet the dog. Sometimes a dog will respond differently to different people. You don’t want to find out that your new pet doesn’t like kids AFTER you get him home!

Finally, 25 to 30 percent of dogs in shelters are purebreds. So, you don’t have to go to a breeder, or God forbid a pet store, to get a pedigreed pooch. Plus, shelters get new animals almost daily, so if you don’t see one that is right for you on your first visit, just wait and go back again another time. Many shelters will take your preference down and notify you if the breed you are looking for comes in. A lot of shelters have more than just dogs and cats in residence. Many rescue pocket pets (like hamsters, guinea pigs, and gerbils), rabbits, birds, even turtles and snakes. So give a homeless animal a chance for a good life. Adopt a shelter pet!

Dogs featured on “The Early Show”:

(See photos of these dogs in this story’s photo area above.)

o Cody is a 7-year-old male/neutered Pomeranian. He is VERY sweet and quiet!

o Rocky is a 2-year-old male/neutered Poodle mix. He is very friendly and playful, with a very cheerful disposition.

o Nick is a 5-month-old male/neutered Boxer mix. Nick is so nice! He loves to walk, play fetch and is generally very fun loving, a real puppy!!

o Flops is a 10-year-old Lab mix. He is super sweet and friendly. He just is slightly arthritic and shouldn’t take too many stairs.

If you are interested in adopting any of these dogs, go to the Humane Society of New York for more information.

http://www.cbsnews.com/news/top-tips-for-adopting-a-shelter-dog/

6 tips for mastering the dog walk

Here are six dog training tips on how to walk your dog and master the dog walk. When I’m out with my dog pack, I often walk about ten dogs at a time, sometimes even off-leash if I’m in a safe area. People are amazed by this, but it’s simple: the dogs see me as their pack leader. This is why dogs follow me wherever I go.

1. Walk in front of your dog.

Walking in front of your dog allows you to be seen as the pack leader. Conversely, if your dog controls you on the walk, he’s the pack leader. You should be the first one out the door and the first one in. Your dog should be beside or behind you during the walk.

2. Use a short dog leash.

This allows you to have more control. Attaching the leash to the very top of the neck can help you more easily communicate, guide, and correct your dog. If you need additional help, consider the Pack Leader Collar. Always keep your dog’s safety in mind when giving corrections.

3. Give yourself enough time for the dog walk.

Dogs, like humans, are diurnal, so taking walks in the morning is ideal. I recommend setting aside thirty minutes to a full hour. The specific needs of each dog differ. Consult your vet and keep an eye on your dog’s behavior to see if his needs are being met.

4. How to reward your dog during the walk.

After your dog has maintained the proper state of mind, reward him by allowing him to relieve himself and sniff around. Then you need to decide when reward time is over. It should always be less than the time spent focused on the walk.

5. Keep leading, even after the walk.

When you get home, don’t stop leading. Have your dog wait patiently while you put away his leash or take off your shoes.

6. Reward your dog after the walk.

By providing a meal after the walk, you have allowed your dog to “work” for food and water.

And don’t forget to set a good example by always picking up after your dog!

How about you? Are you having trouble mastering the walk? Share your experience with us in the comments!

https://www.cesarsway.com/dog-training/walking/6-tips-for-mastering-the-dog-walk

6 tips for mastering the dog walk

Here are six dog training tips on how to walk your dog and master the dog walk. When I’m out with my dog pack, I often walk about ten dogs at a time, sometimes even off-leash if I’m in a safe area. People are amazed by this, but it’s simple: the dogs see me as their pack leader. This is why dogs follow me wherever I go.

1. Walk in front of your dog.

Walking in front of your dog allows you to be seen as the pack leader. Conversely, if your dog controls you on the walk, he’s the pack leader. You should be the first one out the door and the first one in. Your dog should be beside or behind you during the walk.

2. Use a short dog leash.

This allows you to have more control. Attaching the leash to the very top of the neck can help you more easily communicate, guide, and correct your dog. If you need additional help, consider the Pack Leader Collar. Always keep your dog’s safety in mind when giving corrections.

3. Give yourself enough time for the dog walk.

Dogs, like humans, are diurnal, so taking walks in the morning is ideal. I recommend setting aside thirty minutes to a full hour. The specific needs of each dog differ. Consult your vet and keep an eye on your dog’s behavior to see if his needs are being met.

4. How to reward your dog during the walk.

After your dog has maintained the proper state of mind, reward him by allowing him to relieve himself and sniff around. Then you need to decide when reward time is over. It should always be less than the time spent focused on the walk.

5. Keep leading, even after the walk.

When you get home, don’t stop leading. Have your dog wait patiently while you put away his leash or take off your shoes.

6. Reward your dog after the walk.

By providing a meal after the walk, you have allowed your dog to “work” for food and water.

And don’t forget to set a good example by always picking up after your dog!

How about you? Are you having trouble mastering the walk? Share your experience with us in the comments!

https://www.cesarsway.com/dog-training/walking/6-tips-for-mastering-the-dog-walk

Training Your Dogs to Stick Around: Boundary Training

Boundary Training for Dogs

by Lauren Schwaar

During the summer months, dog owners have the tendency to

be outside much more with their pooches. This is all well and good–

until dogs start bolting down the street, disappearing from the yard,

chasing kids or other dogs, and causing general mayhem. These problems

often cause dog owners much stress. Every dog owner has at least one

story of their dog getting into trouble, and sometimes danger, because

of these stunts.

Fortunately, these behaviors are relatively

easy to train for, assuming that you do it correctly. I decided to

speak with a professional dog trainer about this very subject, and the

following are the answers I was given.

Me: “I just got a new

Lab puppy. I have been taking her out on a leash. We have two acres

surrounded by woods. What is the best way to train her to stay close to

the house and not run off into the woods?” So in a more general sense,

how do you train a dog to obey you when you’re not there?

Paula,

the Professional Dog Trainer: First of all, you can’t leave the dog

outside when you’re not there until you know that he’s going to stick

around when you are there.

Step One: Set up a boundary

You can boundary-train a dog pretty easily. Put up a boundary that the

dog can see, whether it’s flags, or a painted line on the ground.

Step Two: Teach Your Dog the Meaning of the Boundary

I

might even put a little buckle collar and a leash on the puppy and walk

along a couple feet from the line. Then every time the puppy goes to

cross the line, give the puppy a little tug and tell him “No” to get

him to stay on my side of the line.

Step Three: Advance to “Hard”

When you get that (at whatever distance it is that you want from the

house) while walking them around on a leash, I would put a long-line on

them and I would stay twenty or thirty feet back and let him go out and

do his thing. If he went to cross the line, I’d give him a tug again.

Step Four: Not for Dogs who are Faint of Heart!

When

the dog was really good in those circumstances at staying there, then

(and at this point the dog would have a bit of training on him because

he’d be a little bit older) I’d do things to entice the dog to cross

the line. I’d roll a ball over the line, and then by that point he

would understand what a correction is, so I’d correct him for going

over the line.

Me: Does there have to be a physical or visible marker in order to train the dog to respect a boundary?

Paula,

the expert Dog Trainer: I don’t think you can just say “don’t go any

further than that” in the yard. You can get little stakes with flags

and put them out while you’re training them. But once you have them

trained, you won’t need the boundary anymore. Then they’ll know.

Branching Out (Literally)

Me: Would this technique work for a large area, like two acres?

Paula:

Oh sure. You can make any boundary. The only advice I would give is

that if you don’t want your dog to go in the woods, don’t make the

woods the boundary. Make it twenty feet before the woods. Always give

yourself a little bit of leeway there. But there’s no size limit to it.

Again, what’s important is that you do it the same every time.

Every time the puppy goes out, you need to walk the boundary. I’ve had

people tell me that they get a young puppy and when they walk it around

the yard once, the dog never leaves the property. And then there are

other dogs with which it takes more effort and more work. But dogs are

creatures of consistency. If you do it the same way all the time,

they’ll just do it. But if half the time you let them cross the line

and the other half of the time you tell them not to, then he’s going to

cross the line whenever he feels like it.

There you have it, folks– a fail-proof method for teaching your dog to stay within a certain distance or boundary.

Good Applications

One

good way to use this technique would be to use the grass/curb in your

front yard to form a boundary. You can use the leash techniques

outlined above to train your dog not to cross the curb into the street.

Another application for this technique is by using it inside

your house. If there is a room that you don’t want your dog to go into

(or come out of), use this technique to boundary-train your dog.

A third way to use this method is to warm up into exercise (read about the secrets of correct dog exercise here)

by working this method for about fifteen minutes before you exercise

your dog. Working through a training exercise with your dog before

allowing him to run around and play not only builds a positive attitude

towards training, but will help you to better manage him by limiting

his exercising room to the boundary you tought him.

Once you’ve tried this out, feel free to comment and tell me how it worked out for you!

To watch two dog training videos that are normally part of the Response Revolution training course for FREE, click here: free dog training videos!

http://hubpages.com/animals/boundary-training-your-dogs

Training Your Dogs to Stick Around: Boundary Training

Boundary Training for Dogs

by Lauren Schwaar

During the summer months, dog owners have the tendency to

be outside much more with their pooches. This is all well and good–

until dogs start bolting down the street, disappearing from the yard,

chasing kids or other dogs, and causing general mayhem. These problems

often cause dog owners much stress. Every dog owner has at least one

story of their dog getting into trouble, and sometimes danger, because

of these stunts.

Fortunately, these behaviors are relatively

easy to train for, assuming that you do it correctly. I decided to

speak with a professional dog trainer about this very subject, and the

following are the answers I was given.

Me: “I just got a new

Lab puppy. I have been taking her out on a leash. We have two acres

surrounded by woods. What is the best way to train her to stay close to

the house and not run off into the woods?” So in a more general sense,

how do you train a dog to obey you when you’re not there?

Paula,

the Professional Dog Trainer: First of all, you can’t leave the dog

outside when you’re not there until you know that he’s going to stick

around when you are there.

Step One: Set up a boundary

You can boundary-train a dog pretty easily. Put up a boundary that the

dog can see, whether it’s flags, or a painted line on the ground.

Step Two: Teach Your Dog the Meaning of the Boundary

I

might even put a little buckle collar and a leash on the puppy and walk

along a couple feet from the line. Then every time the puppy goes to

cross the line, give the puppy a little tug and tell him “No” to get

him to stay on my side of the line.

Step Three: Advance to “Hard”

When you get that (at whatever distance it is that you want from the

house) while walking them around on a leash, I would put a long-line on

them and I would stay twenty or thirty feet back and let him go out and

do his thing. If he went to cross the line, I’d give him a tug again.

Step Four: Not for Dogs who are Faint of Heart!

When

the dog was really good in those circumstances at staying there, then

(and at this point the dog would have a bit of training on him because

he’d be a little bit older) I’d do things to entice the dog to cross

the line. I’d roll a ball over the line, and then by that point he

would understand what a correction is, so I’d correct him for going

over the line.

Me: Does there have to be a physical or visible marker in order to train the dog to respect a boundary?

Paula,

the expert Dog Trainer: I don’t think you can just say “don’t go any

further than that” in the yard. You can get little stakes with flags

and put them out while you’re training them. But once you have them

trained, you won’t need the boundary anymore. Then they’ll know.

Branching Out (Literally)

Me: Would this technique work for a large area, like two acres?

Paula:

Oh sure. You can make any boundary. The only advice I would give is

that if you don’t want your dog to go in the woods, don’t make the

woods the boundary. Make it twenty feet before the woods. Always give

yourself a little bit of leeway there. But there’s no size limit to it.

Again, what’s important is that you do it the same every time.

Every time the puppy goes out, you need to walk the boundary. I’ve had

people tell me that they get a young puppy and when they walk it around

the yard once, the dog never leaves the property. And then there are

other dogs with which it takes more effort and more work. But dogs are

creatures of consistency. If you do it the same way all the time,

they’ll just do it. But if half the time you let them cross the line

and the other half of the time you tell them not to, then he’s going to

cross the line whenever he feels like it.

There you have it, folks– a fail-proof method for teaching your dog to stay within a certain distance or boundary.

Good Applications

One

good way to use this technique would be to use the grass/curb in your

front yard to form a boundary. You can use the leash techniques

outlined above to train your dog not to cross the curb into the street.

Another application for this technique is by using it inside

your house. If there is a room that you don’t want your dog to go into

(or come out of), use this technique to boundary-train your dog.

A third way to use this method is to warm up into exercise (read about the secrets of correct dog exercise here)

by working this method for about fifteen minutes before you exercise

your dog. Working through a training exercise with your dog before

allowing him to run around and play not only builds a positive attitude

towards training, but will help you to better manage him by limiting

his exercising room to the boundary you tought him.

Once you’ve tried this out, feel free to comment and tell me how it worked out for you!

To watch two dog training videos that are normally part of the Response Revolution training course for FREE, click here: free dog training videos!

http://hubpages.com/animals/boundary-training-your-dogs