Helping You Figure Out Dogs With These Easy Tips

Are you considering the idea of adopting a dog? Are you already the proud owner of a atlanta dog walking service dog? If yes, then you came to the right place as the tips here are just what you need. You will find many pieces of information that can make owning a dog a wonderful experience for years to come.

Yearly physicals help you and yearly vet checks help your dog. Since dogs cannot talk, it’s difficult to know if your dog is in pain. You need to go to the vet every year to get a check up.

If you’re taking your pup on a vacation, make sure that you take a picture of him for on your phone. In the event that he gets separated from you, you have easy access to a current photo to put on flyers that will help identify him.

Do not fall prey to the temptation to feed table scraps to your dog. Feeding a dog from the table only reinforces begging. The dog will also be less likely to eat its normal food. Overfeeding him will lead to obesity, diabetes, and heart disease, too. If you spend the time to train your dog to spend mealtimes well removed from the table, there won’t be any scrap-feeding temptations to worry about.

Do not overlook your dog’s bad behavior. You should never ignore bad behaviors when they are puppies because this will make it a lot harder to correct down the road. It is possible that your dog could injure a person, and that person could be you! So correct unwanted behavior right away.

Whenever you adopt from the pound, take the dog straight to the vet. Shelter dogs could be sick or exposed to different viruses. Have your dog checked over and given vaccinations as soon as possible.

Teach your dog the proper way to walk while on a leash. He needs to know to heel next to you, not behind you or in front of you. Walking like this can keep them safe and help you enjoy walks too. Even if you decide to give him additional slack on the leash from time to time, teaching your dog to heel remains an important task as a pet owner.

Always follow through with instructions from your vet if your dog has medication or needs special attention. They might not be fond of having a cone attached to their head, but your vet recommended it. Your vet makes recommendations that will help your dog be happy and healthy, so you should follow your vet’s advice.

Make sure your let your dog know you love him. As is the case with most things in life, owners often pay more attention to the bad behavior than the good. You might have a hard time later on. Try praising them at least 5 times more than when you scold them. Your dog will be far more likely to try to behave properly.

Stimulate your dog mentally and physically with plenty of exercise. Teach your dog to retrieve the newspaper or perform chores in your home. Doing this will help your pet to feel like a loved and needed family member, and teaching your dog these skills will give it some much needed mental exercise.

Stepping on sharp objects or glass is a common hazard for dogs waling outside. Wash the cut with antibacterial soap, dry it thoroughly, and leave it to air dry unless it is bleeding or the dog is licking it. If you think the cut is fairly deep you should see a vet.

Schedule appointments with the vet regularly. Your dog should see a vet at least twice a year to make sure they are in good health and that they do not need new shots. You will need to see a vet more often if the dog is a puppy. If you see any signs of injury or illness, talk to your vet immediately.

Are you well-versed in the knowledge of what it takes to be a dog owner now that you read this article? If you did not, consider rereading a few of the tips. This will allow you to already have a solution to problems before they arise. To have a good balanced relation with your dog, implement these tips every day.

5 essential commands you can teach your dog

By Juliana Weiss-Roessler

Having a trained dog isn’t the same as having a balanced dog, but if your dog knows a few basic commands, it can be helpful when tackling problem behaviors — existing ones or those that may develop in the future.

So where do you start with dog obedience training? You could take a class, but it’s not necessary; you can do it yourself. In fact, with the right attitude, it can be fun for both you and your dog!

Sit

This is one of the easiest dog obedience commands to teach, so it’s a good one to start with.

Hold a treat close to your dog’s nose.

Move your hand up, allowing his head to follow the treat and causing his bottom to lower.

Once he’s in sitting position, say “Sit,” give him the treat, and share affection.

Repeat this sequence a few times every day until your dog has it mastered. Then ask your dog to sit before mealtime, when leaving for walks, and during other situations where you’d like him calm and seated.

Come

This command can help keep a dog out of trouble, bringing him back to you if you lose grip on the leash or accidentally leave the front door open.

Put a leash and collar on your dog.

Go down to his level and say, “Come,” while gently pulling on the leash.

When he gets to you, reward him with affection and a treat.

Once he’s mastered it with the leash, remove it — and practice the command in a safe, enclosed area.

Down

This can be one of the more difficult commands in dog obedience training. Why? Because the position is a submissive posture. You can help by keeping training positive and relaxed, particularly with fearful or anxious dogs.

Find a particularly good smelling treat, and hold it in your closed fist.

Hold your hand up to your dog’s snout. When he sniffs it, move your hand to the floor, so he follows.

Then slide your hand along the ground in front of him to encourage his body to follow his head.

Once he’s in the down position, say “Down,” give him the treat, and share affection.

Repeat it every day. If your dog tries to sit up or lunges toward your hand, say “No” and take your hand away. Don’t push him into a down position, and encourage every step your dog takes toward the right position. After all, he’s working hard to figure it out!

Stay

Before attempting this one, make sure your dog is an expert at the “Sit” command.

First, ask your dog to “Sit.”

Then open the palm of your hand in front of you, and say “Stay.”

Take a few steps back. Reward him with a treat and affection if he stays.

Gradually increase the number of steps you take before giving the treat.

Always reward your pup for staying put — even if it’s just for a few seconds.

This is an exercise in self-control for your dog, so don’t be discouraged if it takes a while to master, particularly for puppies and high-energy dogs. After all, they want to be on the move and not just sitting there waiting.

Leave it

This can help keep your dog safe when his curiosity gets the better of him, like if he smells something intriguing but possibly dangerous on the ground! The goal is to teach your pup that he gets something even better for ignoring the other item.

Place a treat in both hands.

Show him one enclosed fist with the treat inside, and say, “Leave it.”

Let him lick, sniff, mouth, paw, and bark to try to get it — and ignore the behaviors.

Once he stops trying, give him the treat from the other hand.

Repeat until your dog moves away from that first fist when you say, “Leave it.”

Next, only give your dog the treat when he moves away from that first fist and also looks up at you.

Once your dog consistently moves away from the first treat and gives you eye contact when you say the command, you’re ready to take it up a notch. For this, use two different treats — one that’s just all right and one that’s a particularly good smelling and tasty favorite for your pup.

Say “Leave it,” place the less attractive treat on the floor, and cover it with your hand.

Wait until your dog ignores that treat and looks at you. Then remove that treat from the floor, give him the better treat and share affection immediately.

Once he’s got it, place the less tasty treat on the floor… but don’t completely cover it with your hand. Instead hold it a little bit above the treat. Over time, gradually move your hand farther and farther away until your hand is about 6 inches above.

Now he’s ready to practice with you standing up! Follow the same steps, but if he tries to snatch the less tasty treat, cover it with your foot.

Don’t rush the process. Remember, you’re asking a lot of your dog. If you take it up a notch and he’s really struggling, go back to the previous stage.

Just these five simple commands can help keep your dog safer and improve your communication with him. It’s well worth the investment of your time and effort. Remember, the process takes time, so only start a dog obedience training session if you’re in the right mindset to practice calm-assertive energy and patience.

Do you train your own dogs? Why?

https://www.cesarsway.com/dog-training/obedience/5-essential-commands-you-can-teach-your-dog

Top Ten Dog Training Tips

Traci Theis and Kellyann Conway

Top Ten Dog Training TipsThinkstock

Listen to Your Dog

Learn to listen to your dog. If your dog appears to be uncomfortable meeting another dog, animal or person, don’t insist that he say hello. He’s telling you that he isn’t comfortable for a reason, and you should respect that. Forcing the issue can often result in bigger problems down the line.

Be Generous with Your Affection

Most people don’t have a problem being very clear about when they are unhappy with their dogs, but, they often ignore the good stuff. Big mistake! Make sure you give your dog lots of attention when he’s doing the right thing. Let him know when he’s been a good boy. That’s the time to be extra generous with your attention and praise. It’s even okay to be a little over the top.

Does He Really Like It?

Just because the bag says “a treat all dogs love” doesn’t mean your dog will automatically love it. Some dogs are very selective about what they like to eat. Soft and chewy treats are usually more exciting for your dog than hard and crunchy treats. Keep your eyes open for what he enjoys.

Tell Him What You Want Him to Do

There is nothing inherently wrong with telling your dog “no,” except that it doesn’t give him enough information. Instead of telling your dog “no,” tell him what you want him to do. Dogs don’t generalize well, so if your dog jumps up on someone to say hello and you say no, he may jump higher or he may jump to the left side instead of the right. A better alternative would be to ask him to “sit.” Tell him what you want him to do in order to avoid confusion.

Be Consistent

Whenever you’re training your dog, it’s important to get as many family members involved as possible so everyone’s on the same page. If you are telling your dog “off” when he jumps on the couch and someone else is saying “down,” while someone else is letting him hang out up there, how on earth is he ever going to learn what you want? Consistency will be the key to your success.

Have Realistic Expectations

Changing behavior takes time. You need to have realistic expectations about changing your dog’s behavior as well as how long it will take to change behaviors that you don’t like. Often behaviors which are “normal” doggie behaviors will take the most time such as barking, digging and jumping. You also need to consider how long your dog has rehearsed the behavior. For example, if you didn’t mind that your dog jumped up on people to say hi for the last seven years and now you decide that you don’t want him to do that anymore, that behavior will take a much longer time to undo than if you had addressed it when he was a pup. Remember it’s never too late to change the behavior some will just take longer than others.

Don’t Underestimate the Benefits of Feeding a High Quality Food

Feed your dog a high-quality diet with appropriate amounts of protein. If your dog spends most of his days lounging in your condo, don’t feed him food with a protein level that is ideal for dogs who herd sheep all day. The money that you will spend on feeding an appropriate quality food will often be money that you save in vet bills later on. I recommend you always check with your veterinarian for the right diet for your dog.

You Get What You Reinforce – Not Necessarily What You Want

If your dog exhibits a behavior you don’t like, there is a strong likelihood that it’s something that has been reinforced before. A great example is when your dog brings you a toy and barks to entice you to throw it. You throw the toy. Your dog has just learned that barking gets you to do what he wants. You say “no,” and he barks even more. Heaven forbid you give in and throw the toy now! Why? Because you will have taught him persistence pays off. Before you know it you’ll have a dog that barks and barks every time he wants something. The solution? Ignore his barking or ask him to do something for you (like “sit”) before you throw his toy.

Bribery vs. Reward

The idea of using treats to train is often equated with bribery. Truthfully, dogs do what works. If using treats gets them to do what you want, then why not? You can also use the world around you as a reinforcement. Every interaction you have with your dog is a learning opportunity, so when you think about it, you probably don’t use food very often except during active training sessions. So why does your dog continue to hang out? Because you reinforce him with praise, touch, games and walks. Just remember, the behavior should produce the treat; the treat should not produce the behavior.

Freedom

Let your new dog gradually earn freedom throughout your home. A common error that many pet parents make is giving their new dog too much freedom too soon. This can easily lead to accidents relating to housetraining and destructive chewing. So, close off doors to unoccupied rooms and use baby gates to section off parts of the house, if necessary. One of the best ways to minimize incidents is to keep your dog tethered to you in the house and by using a crate or doggie safe area when you can’t actively supervise him.

https://www.petfinder.com/dogs/dog-training/dog-training-tips/

Therapy Dogs Help Veterans Soldier On

After finishing three tours of duty in Iraq, Jim Stanek was grateful to head home with all his limbs intact. But a traumatic brain injury and post-traumatic stress disorder made it difficult to live a normal life.

“I didn’t want to socialize, I had a terrible memory and my anxiety through the roof,” he recalled.

The only thing that seemed to help the 36-year-old New Mexico native calm his nerves was being around a friend’s therapy dog. So in May of 2010, he and his wife Lindsey decided to train his 5-year-old rescue mutt, Sarge, for therapy work.

The Staneks quickly learned that it can take up to two years and $60,000 to train a therapy dog properly — big obstacles they felt, for any veteran who might benefit from having a canine partner to help cope with the psychological and physical wounds of war. They decided to start Paws and Stripes, a non-profit that matches up therapy dogs with veterans.

Lindsey Stanek and Jim Stanek, founders of Paws and Stripes and stars of A&E’s “Dogs of War” walk during the 2K-9 Race, Oct. 26, 2014 in Washington.

Stanek’s wife Lindsey said she felt they were blessed because they quickly found trainers willing to help. The next step was to search for the dogs.

Normally therapy dogs are purebreds that start training with a handler as puppies and turned over to their owners at around the age of two. But the Staneks decided to scour local shelters to look for adult mixed breed dogs that were smart, friendly and confident.

“We wanted to give veterans a dog and the dogs a second chance,” Stanek’s wife said.

They cut training time down to about nine months by matching each dog with veteran-in-need at the beginning of the process so they could learn the ropes together. They also managed to pare down the cost to just over $6,300 which they fund largely through public donations.

The dogs help their partners deal with a variety of common problems that plague returning veterans. Some dogs help deal with psychological problems like PTSD while some alert their owners to oncoming migraines or low blood sugar. Others are trained to assist their owners with physical disabilities resulting from their battle injuries.

Sarge for example, is trained to spot Stanek’s panic attacks and keep him calm.

“I can tell the rest of the world I’m doing fine but she calls me a liar by wrinkling her forehead to alert me when my anxiety is getting higher,” he explained.

Sarge has also been taught to peak around the corners when out in public, wagging her tail to give the all clear. Stanek said this helps him deal with the “dead space” he learned to fear in combat.

The American Kennel Club is supportive of the Stanek’s efforts and other programs like it.

“Dogs give unconditional love and support and have an uncanny ability to detect when we are having a hard time,” said Mary Burch, an animal behaviorist and the AKC’s canine good citizen director.

A&E’s “Dogs Of War” 2K-9 Race honoring veterans and celebrating their canine companions, Oct. 26, 2014 in Washington.

The Staneks said they’ve graduated more than 50 veteran-and-dog teams throughout the country from their program. They have 600 veterans on the waiting list and hope to match each one with a dog.

Stanek for one is grateful for his relationship with Sarge.

“She makes me feel like the luckiest guy in the world,” he said. “I’d take a bullet for that dog.”

The Stanek’s efforts are chronicled on Dogs of War, a new show on A&E premiering tonight in honor of Veteran’s Day.

http://abcnews.go.com/Health/therapy-dogs-veterans-soldier/story?id=26812821

6 tips for mastering the dog walk

Here are six dog training tips on how to walk your dog and master the dog walk. When I’m out with my dog pack, I often walk about ten dogs at a time, sometimes even off-leash if I’m in a safe area. People are amazed by this, but it’s simple: the dogs see me as their pack leader. This is why dogs follow me wherever I go.

1. Walk in front of your dog.

Walking in front of your dog allows you to be seen as the pack leader. Conversely, if your dog controls you on the walk, he’s the pack leader. You should be the first one out the door and the first one in. Your dog should be beside or behind you during the walk.

2. Use a short dog leash.

This allows you to have more control. Attaching the leash to the very top of the neck can help you more easily communicate, guide, and correct your dog. If you need additional help, consider the Pack Leader Collar. Always keep your dog’s safety in mind when giving corrections.

3. Give yourself enough time for the dog walk.

Dogs, like humans, are diurnal, so taking walks in the morning is ideal. I recommend setting aside thirty minutes to a full hour. The specific needs of each dog differ. Consult your vet and keep an eye on your dog’s behavior to see if his needs are being met.

4. How to reward your dog during the walk.

After your dog has maintained the proper state of mind, reward him by allowing him to relieve himself and sniff around. Then you need to decide when reward time is over. It should always be less than the time spent focused on the walk.

5. Keep leading, even after the walk.

When you get home, don’t stop leading. Have your dog wait patiently while you put away his leash or take off your shoes.

6. Reward your dog after the walk.

By providing a meal after the walk, you have allowed your dog to “work” for food and water.

And don’t forget to set a good example by always picking up after your dog!

How about you? Are you having trouble mastering the walk? Share your experience with us in the comments!

https://www.cesarsway.com/dog-training/walking/6-tips-for-mastering-the-dog-walk

The Ins And Outs Of Your Furry Friends

Do you want to learn more about the various dog foods available? Many people think that mass manufactured dog food doesn’t contain enough nutrients. You can improve the situation with a little research on your part. The following article will give you some great tips to help you better understand your dog’s needs.

Since dogs cannot talk, you’ll need to learn about your dog’s way of communication. You should never pressure your pet into interacting with strangers, be they human or canine. That could lead to another person or dog being bitten. Look for non-verbal cues and follow what the http://www.dogwalkeratlanta.org/ dog is telling you.

Don’t let a dog go off property without their leash, even if they’re well behaved. A dog might run after an animal and get into trouble, or it might get into a fight with another animal. As the owner, you will be held responsible for any damages your dog causes.

The dog breed you choose should blend in well with your lifestyle. For example, someone that stays inside a lot would want a calm lap dog and not a hyper breed. By the same token, if you are a quiet person, you should choose a quiet lap dog. You should find a dog that fits well with your personality.

Trim your dog’s nails on a regular basis. If they get too long and start to curl, the result could be painful injuries to the nail beds and your dog’s paws. You can buy clippers in a pet store and do them yourself. If you’d prefer, you can have the groomers trim your pup’s nails.

When selecting a brand of dog food for your pet, read the labels carefully and avoid the cheapest brands. Over the course of the dogs life he will be much healthier if you stick to high quality food with plenty of nutritional value. Although it will cost you more, you can feel good about the fact that you aren’t skimping when it comes to what your pet eats.

You might find a pure breed dog at the pound. Lots of http://dogs.oodle.com/ dog owners will leave their dog stranded whenever they don’t want it anymore. Call the pound to find ask what dog breeds are in house at the time. You may get to save a canine’s life if you do this!

Really show your dog some love. Make sure you don’t only focus on the negative things that your dog does. That could mean trouble later with your dog. Try praising them at least 5 times more than when you scold them. This increases the chance that your dog will repeat the good behavior rather than the bad.

If your female dog is in heat be cautious – she could very easily become pregnant. A male canine might sense her from a distance of five miles. The dog might also want to fight other dogs, and become pregnant.

When you are training your dog, don’t have too many people telling your dog what to do. Everyone does things differently, and too many commanders may confuse your dog. You should have one person take charge of the training procedure, and then ask everyone else to follow their lead once the dog has learned a few simple commands. This allows for consistency that is least likely to confuse your pet.

You dog should go to the vet on a regular basis. Dogs must see their vet for full exams, vaccinations and routine testing. With a puppy, you will need to visit your vet a little more often. If your dog appears to be hurt or sick, they need to be brought to the vet immediately.

When you select food for your dog, do so with care. A number of dog foods are available, but you must choose one that suits your dog’s age and size. When you give your dog leftovers to save money, you have to make sure your dog is getting the right nutrients and vitamins.

As you can see, there are many options to properly care and feed your dog. There are a number of choices aside from what’s stocked on store shelves. Keep the ideas from this piece in mind to ensure a lifetime of quality care for your dog.

Dealing With Loose Aggressive Dogs On Walks

Dealing With Loose Aggressive Dogs On Walks

 by: Paul Smith

This can be quite a problem for some dog owners, what do you do if a loose dog comes over to you and your dog, the situation can be quite intimidating especially if you have a small dog and the one coming toward you is much larger or aggressive.

The reason I have written this article is because I was on a dog forum recently and read a hart wrenching post from a lady who held her dying dog in her arms after it was attacked in front of her by a loose dog that snapped it’s neck.

I do not always keep my dog on a lead but I have a rule I always use when I am out with her, if she is off the lead and I see another dog with it’s owner if that dog is off the lead I keep Brandy off hers, I make the assumption that the other dogs owner knows their dog is all right interacting with other dogs, however if the owner has their dog on a lead I then put Brandy on hers. This is because I feel if the owner of the other dog is unsure how their dog will react to mine I should do everything I can to help their dog be combatable, this is just a rule I use when out with Brandy.

There are times when you need to deal with dogs who’s owner is either not responsible or is not around in there situations I believe there are a number of options you might consider taking.

Dog with owner

If you come across an aggressive dog off its lead but with the owner then it might be worth having a quick word with the owner and suggesting he keep his dog on a lead when other dogs are around.

Aggressive dogs

If you are lightly to come across aggressive dogs on your walk then there are three things I would recommend you could carry with you to deter an attack.

Pepper spray

You can get dog safe pepper spray, this will cause the dog discomfort and stop the initial attack, it also acts as a deterrent from future attacks, if a dog recognises you as someone who has caused him pain he should avoid you in the future. I think this is an extreme measure and I would only use it if there were lightly to be in danger of harm to Brandy or myself.

Ultra sonic alarm

You can buy ultra sonic alarms that can be heard by dogs but not people, this will cause the dog to get distracted and the sound will not be pleasant to him but should cause no permanent harm.

Carry a stick

This is an option you could consider a walking stick waved at a dog as it starts to become aggressive can often deter an attack, and might stop the situation developing further.

Call the dog warden

Whatever tactic you decide to take you should call the dog warden or animal welfare as soon as you are able to, the dog might be lost and hungry or it might attack someone who is not as prepared so reporting it might help it and save someone the hart ache of loosing a loved pet.

About The Author

Paul Smith has been a dog specialist for 20 years, training dogs for both the police and shows download his free ebook here Http://www.tall-indoor-dog-gates.com Now.

This article was posted on January 28, 2006

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Top 10 Healthiest Dog Breeds

Woof!

No other animal has aided humanity’s rise to preeminence on this planet more than the canine.

Domesticated thousands of years ago, dogs (initially from wolf stock) insured survival of the human organism.  Recent scholarship points up that Cro-Magnons’ eventual supremacy over the Neanderthals (with whom they shared the wilds of Europe around 40,000 years ago) was not because of greater brain capacity or technology (the two groups were roughly equal in that sense with Neanderthal having a slight edge).

No, it was because of the domestication of canines that Cro-Magnon supplanted his stockier and (perhaps) more evolutionarily favored neighbors, the Neanderthals (who had no furry friends by the fireside).

Dogs led to an increase of 56% in successful hunting (as retrievers and “weapons”).  This “extra” food meant Cro-Magnon had an advantage over Neanderthals (who tended to view the gnarly canine as a food source and not an ally).  They also provided protection from “outsiders” (whether man or beast) and much-needed warmth on colder Ice Age nights when fire alone wasn’t enough.

Dogs are resourceful, and of all the animals on the planet, they are perhaps the most interlaced with humanity’s development from cave-dwelling creatures into the settled tribes seen today.

Their history is one of continual genetic refinement.  Humans have cross-bred and inbred animals over the millennia to achieve perceived perfection of form or to enhance desirable traits, such as longer hair or better herding capabilities.  Unfortunately, if left unchecked, this inbreeding results in poorer animals because inbreeding increases the likelihood of mutations and other recessive defects becoming dominant in any given breed.

The quest for the “healthiest” is a fallacious one in the sense that there is almost no single breed that is the “healthiest” of all.  Inbreeding for show purposes has seen to that.  In the past, what were typified as “working” dogs (herders, such as collies; or “sporting” dogs, such as retrievers) were healthier than other breeds.  Although this is no longer generally true, there are still some whose overall health is better than most, despite inbreeding. 

Those noted here have some of the fewest overall health issues, and all have better than average life spans (ranging on average from ten to sixteen years).   An interesting correlative as a health indicator: the larger the animal, the more physical problems it is susceptible to.  Size is the one trait that has a rather linear correlation with lifespan.  Bigger canines have shorter life spans and suffer more often from crippling arthritis and hip dysplasia.  At the other end of the scale, extremely small dogs (inbred to continually reduce their size) may suffer more disorders than their standard-sized counterparts (kidney and other organ failures).

Obesity, as with humans, is a growing problem with dogs as well.  Obesity is the owner’s fault, not the dog’s.  Overfeeding and improper exercise combine to shorten any pet’s life.  Proper diet is important.  However, obesity in some breeds is a clear sign of Cushing’s disease (a glandular problem).

All the dogs mentioned here are wonderful animals; all have their fans and proud owners.  Each has its special traits that make it desirable for whatever reason.

This is not a “favorite” list.  This is a practical recitation of popular breeds comparatively–these breeds overall exhibit fewer health issues than many others, and they are ranked accordingly.  Thus, the number ten dog is subject to more potential physical problems than the number two dog.

Every one on this list, however, is far and away healthier and less costly in vet visits than many other popular breeds.

Top 10 Healthiest Dog Breeds

#10–Border Collie

This dog, despite being number ten on this top ten healthiest dogs list, is regarded as the most intelligent almost universally.  The Border Collie is an older breed of work dog, and is the most widespread of the Collie breeds.  It was developed along the Anglo-Scottish frontier for livestock herding, especially sheep.

Anyone who has ever had the pleasure of watching one of these dogs in action herding a flock of sheep is amazed at the energy and genuine intuition the dog brings to the task.  These dogs are almost prescient, and one Border Collie in early 2011 was discovered to have a vocabulary understanding of over 1,000 words of human speech. 

Hip dysplasia and epilepsy are common along with a breed-specific eye condition called “Collie Eye Anomaly” (affects the retina and sclera of the dog’s eyes, leading to impaired vision).  Also, many succumb to cancer.   

#9–Alaskan Malamute

This beautiful animal, known by many as the typical “Eskimo” sled dog, is a real workhorse of a canine.  They are often confused with Siberian Huskies.

These dogs live and labor in some of the coldest climates on earth–consequently, an obvious problem for them and other trans-Siberian animals is extreme heat.  Though they live many years, hip dysplasia can occur, and they also have a predisposition to hereditary cataracts. 

#8–Shetland Sheepdog

Another herding dog, these little cuties (also known as “Shelties”) are great favorites among small children (in a group of toddlers, Shelties have been observed attempting to “herd” them, an entertaining sight). 

Like all herding breeds they are energetic, but later in life are prone to arthritis and hereditary cataracts.  

#7–German Shepherd

Sometimes called the Alsatian, the German Shepherd ranks third in intelligence (behind the poodle).  It is one of the newest breeds of herding dogs, originating in 1899. 

A major dog health problem relating to spinal curvature has been noted more often in recent years, especially in the Americanized version of the breed (European German Shepherds, not subject to such draconian inbreeding, do not suffer this anomaly as often).

As in larger dogs, they are subject to hip dysplasia.  Also, German Shepherds can exhibit a neurological disorder called myelopathy.  Overall, though, these dogs are durable, and they have served as watch dogs and rescue animals for decades.

Because of these mobility issues they are no longer always the preferred dog for working areas such as in police, military, and search and rescue operations.

#6–Pembroke Welsh Corgi

This stumpy canine with the radar antennae ears is one of the smallest breeds of herding dogs, and yes, it originated in Wales. 

This dog has been a favorite of the British Royal family for over 70 years, and Queen Elizabeth II owns several of them.  It is number eleven in intelligence. 

Most of the health problems these animals develop are related to aging: Von Willebrand’s disease (which affects blood platelets), hip dysplasia, and myelopathy are common.

#5–Labrador Retriever

These are very popular dogs for families with children; the dogs are gentle and patient.

The Labrador Retriever is also very active and playful.  And, as its name clearly states, it loves to play fetch.  They were bred as retrievers of waterfowl; the undercoat is wiry and water-resistant.

Labradors have webbed paws for swimming–its original function was retrieving fishing nets!  By official registration numbers the Labrador is the most popular dog in Canada, the UK, and in the US (since 1991).  They have relatively few health problems; two common ones are hereditary (myelopathy and retinal atrophy). 

#4–Siberian Husky

This stunning dog was bred in the north of Siberia, and it is a member of the Spitz family of dogs.  Its best-known feature is its ice-blue eyes, but these dogs can also have amber or brown eyes, or even eyes of two different colors.  They have the thick musculature of the Alaskan Malamute, and are similarly strong work dogs. They were bred to pull heavy loads long distances through difficult conditions. 

During Alaska’s Nome Gold Rush (1899-1909) they were imported from Asia as sled dogs; they later spread into Canada and the US.  These dogs have few issues of poor health–the two most common are hereditary (eye defects and seizures).  This dog is one of the few to be nearly free of incidence of hip dysplasia (less than 2% incidence rate).

#3–Whippet

Despite its fragile appearance this racing dog is surprisingly hale.  Its lightweight structure, considering it is in the larger breeds of dogs, assures it of no hip dysplasia problems.  Whippets also live an average of 13 years.   They are not subject to any of the common problems of dogs. 

Undescended testicles in the breed are common, however.  Another problem in some animals is called “athletic heart syndrome”.  These dogs were bred to race–their hearts are very large and at rest beat very slowly.  Sometimes, the heartbeat may be arrhythmic or intermittent. 

#2–Rottweiler

This lovable lug was developed as a herding dog in Germany.  They were called “Rottweil butcher’s dogs” because they herded livestock and pulled carts loaded with butchered meats for market.

Rottweilers are now used in search and rescue, as guide dogs for the blind, and as guard or police dogs.  These dogs have almost no health problems, but because of their larger size they can (rarely) develop hip dysplasia.  Overall, they are extremely low maintenance. 

#1–Heinz 57

It may seem as if a cheat has been perpetrated, but the mutt or mongrel is the overall healthiest dog breed on the planet.  This canine, which is just plain “dawg” through and through, has a richly diverse genetic background in his or her makeup and that diversity is what keeps the mutt healthy. 

Mutts rarely develop the consistent genetic disorders some breeds are known for simply because those undesirable traits don’t always get a chance to pass from generation to generation.  They are also highly resistant to parasitism and communicable diseases.  A mutt can be as great a companion as any registered breed, and most have high inherent intelligence. 

As with all dogs they are not resistant to accident, mistreatment, or obesity–owners need to take as good care of their mongrel as they would the most pampered poodle (the dog breed with one of the highest rates of health problems, by the way).

***

by the author–doesn’t have anything to do with dogs!

http://www.infobarrel.com/Top_10_Healthiest_Dog_Breeds

Dogs :: Dog Training Hand Signals

Dog Training Hand Signals should be a chapter in every dog training manual. Training your dog to respond to hand signals can be fun to teach and very easy for your dog to learn, understand and obey.

Hardly any equipment or materials apart from a hungry dog and a few pieces of choice treats are the requirements to get you started and well on your way to training him or her to obey the ‘sit’, ‘down’ or ‘come’ commands issued in the form of hand signals instead of verbal commands.

The first thing to do is to choose a specific and clearly identifiable hand movement or gesture to associate with each command. Getting your dog to respond to that gesture is merely the act of repetition till you succeed.

You start with issuing the verbal command performing the chosen gesture at the same time. You reward the dog with a treat each time the command is obeyed.

When there is clear and spontaneous response to the verbal command and hand signal combination, you then drop the verbal command and start over again only with the hand signal, rewarding the dog with a treat each time the hand signal is obeyed.

Repeat continuously till there is a spontaneous response to the hand signal. Drop the food reward and continue only with the hand signal till there is a clear and spontaneous response.

Now you have mastered dog training hand signals, and will be having your dog, coming to you, sitting down, or lying down near you all on the movements of your hand.

* Sit.

Begin the training session by standing your dog in front of you, with your hands hanging normally and loosely by your sides and with a treat in the hand that you have chosen to use in the signal.

Begin the dog training hand signal by bringing the hand slowly and deliberately up, folding it at the same time as if you are about to throw something over. Let your movement be gradual and reward the dog with the treat as soon as it ‘sits’. Repeat till there is no hesitation by the dog in responding to the command.

Repeat hand signal without verbal command till the dog responds without any hesitation, rewarding each time with a treat. Then repeat the hand signal with intermittent rewards, then one reward every three to four commands and finally no rewards at all.

Test hand signal for spontaneous response without any reward.

* Down.

Begin this session by sitting your dog in front of you, with your hands hanging normally and loosely by your sides with a treat in the hand that you have chosen to use in the signal.

The hand movement for this signal would be the raising your hand above your head. Follow the same procedure as you did in the ‘Sit’ command and test finally for spontaneous response without any reward.

* Come.

Begin this session with the dog in front of you, and your hands hanging normally and loosely by your sides with a treat in the hand that you have chosen to use in the signal.

The hand movement for this signal would be raising your hand to touch the opposite shoulder. If you are using your right hand touch your left shoulder.

Follow the same procedure as you did in the ‘Sit’ and ‘Down’ commands and test finally for spontaneous response without any reward.

You are now a master of Dog Training Hand Signals.

http://www.articlebiz.com/article/459562-1-dog-training-hand-signals/

Thinking On Getting A Dog? Read These Tips!

A dog needs a lot more than just food and attention. You have to show your dog attention and love at all times. How can you learn more about how to care for a dog? The following information in the article you’re about to read has a wealth of knowledge from experts who understand what it takes to properly care for a dog.

It costs a lot of money to own a dog. The costs associated with general and medical care along with high-quality food can be upwards of a thousand per year. Emergency vet visits can cost a ton, so think about purchasing health insurance for your dog.

Your home must be dog-proofed. Before bringing home your new pup, make sure that it’s safe. Put cleaning supplies and medications away and keep indoor trash inside a cabinet. Keep house plants out of his reach, especially if they could be poisonous.

A physical is good for you, and a yearly vet trip is good for your dog. Your dog is not able to talk, so it is not easy to know when he’s got arthritis or an aching tooth. A checkup every year can make sure that issues are caught before he is suffering too much.

Anti-flea products are dangerous. Lots of treatments contain things that can be harmful to kids. Talk to your vet to learn about flea treatments that are safer and more family friendly, and always keep flea medication out of reach of children.

Instead of feeding your dog meat bones, give him rawhide. Real bones can splinter and can get caught in your dog’s mouth or digestive tract. Rawhide is completely healthy and improves the teeth, and therefore is preferable to animal bones.

If your dog seems lonely or seems to have separation anxiety, leave the radio or a CD on when you leave the house. The dog will be less likely to feel anxiety if there is a familiar noise. When it comes to treating your pet’s anxiety, a little music could be exactly what the doctor ordered.

Ensure your dog will return by placing some type of identification on them. This is typically a collar with a tag on it. Include your dog’s name and your phone number on the tag. You can also have your dog micro-chipped.

Just because your dog’s nose is wet and cold doesn’t mean he’s healthy. Sick dogs often have cold, wet noses. Instead, pay attention to how well he is eating and whether or not he seems energetic. You will be able to learn a lot about how your dog might be feeling. You can check the dog’s temperature rectally.

Use a lot of positive reinforcements during dog training. Rewards and praise make your pet learn faster than threats and violence. Using humane training tactics will be healthier for the dog and will be much more effective. If you treat your dog well during training, you’ll see excellent results.

When you’re beginning training, experiment with various reward systems. Each pet is different, and therefore, what motivates him or her is going to be different as well. Use food as a positive reward when you start. If a dog likes toys better, play a little tug o’ war with your puppy if you wish. Petting can be the best reward too.

Change your dog’s bowls daily. Your dog deserves clean bowls as much as you do. Clean the bowls daily and give your dog fresh water and food.

If you or family members are away from home and can’t watch your new puppy, consider crate training. If you do this, your house will not get messed up.

Take your dog on a walk every day, no matter how busy your schedule is. Your pet requires both exercise and the companionship that walking it provides. Walks are a crucial part of a dog’s life.

Take a good look at what you feed your dog. While many dog foods look alike, they can be far apart in quality and this includes foods that are expensive. Talk to your vet to learn which types of food are best for the breed of dog you have, as well as their age and health. The right food can really help your pet live longer.

You will become a much better dog owner if you take the time to learn more about him. Treating your dog with love and care is what you have to do. Imagine being a dog: wouldn’t you want the same done for you?